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Engineering and Engineering Technology

Careers in this field are very lucrative and the job market is very good, nation-wide.  At DCCC we have all the courses required for this major in the first two years of a 4 or 5 year program at most transfer universities with the exception of Statics and Graphics.  These courses have not been taught in the last few years due to lack of enrollment.  They are easy to pick up on line or at a transfer institution however.  Engineering is a very rigorous program of study and engineering students have to commit to taking and mastering a lot of high level math classes, through differential equations.  Depending on enrollment, Calculus II and III and Differential Equations may be offered on an inter-college network system run jointly between DCCC, Garden City Community College, and Seward County Community College.  Refer to the catalog link below for the suggested course work per semester.

A 3-hour per week lab component accompanies each chemistry and physics course.   DCCC has all the required lab equipment and up-to-date facilities needed for producing lab-competent engineering students who are ready to transfer to a university.

Students who make an “A” in the first semester CHEM 111 course are invited to enroll in Honors CHEM 212—which meets at the same time each day as the CHEM 112 course but requires an additional one to two-hour commitment per week with the instructor in either the lecture hall or the laboratory.


Engineering Technology

Careers in this field are very lucrative and the job market is very good, nation-wide. Beginning Engineering Tech graduates usually make almost as much as someone with a regular engineering degree. Advancement in the field is not as lucrative, however and the salary differential between and engineering tech and a regular engineer does increase with time.  

At DCCC we have all the courses required for this major in the first two years of a 4 or 5 year program at most transfer universities with the exception of Statics and Graphics. These courses have not been taught in the last few years due to lack of enrollment. They are easy to pick up on line or at a transfer institution however.  

Engineering tech is a rigorous program of study in its own right, though, and students have to commit to taking and mastering a lot of high level math classes but not as many as is required of a regular engineering degree.  Depending on enrollment, Calculus II and III may be offered on an inter-college network system run jointly between DCCC, Garden City Community College, and Seward County Community College.  Refer to the ctalog link below for the suggested course work per semester, which describes the engineering requirements.  The only difference for engineering technology is that the math requirements begin with college algebra first semester (instead of Calculus I), trigonometry in the second semester (instead of Calculus II), calculus I in the third semester (instead of Calculus III), and calculus II in the fourth semester (instead of differential equations).

A 3-hour per week lab component accompanies each chemistry and physics course.   DCCC has all the required lab equipment and up-to-date facilities needed for producing competent lab-savvy engineering students who are ready to transfer to a university.

Students who make an “A” in the first semester CHEM 111 course are invited to enroll in Honors CHEM 212—which meets at the same time each day as the CHEM 112 course but requires an additional one to two-hour commitment per week with the instructor in either the lecture hall or the laboratory.

College Catalog

This catalog contains the curriculum information a student needs in planning his or her studies at Dodge City Community College.  All students need to become familiar with the language of the college catalog and the necessity of planning a sequence that will provide either a one-year certificate or a two-year degree.  Advisors are provided to assist students in planning their academic program.  As a student, please make sure that you consult your advisor for guidance in planning a program of study.  Students are ultimately responsible for assuring that their academic program meets the requirements for graduation and/or transfer to another degree granting institution.

Contact Information

Barbara Spohr
Professor of Chemistry
2501 N. 14th Ave.
Dodge City, KS 67801
1-800-367-3222
620-227-9420
bspohr@dc3.edu